Traveling To Ancient Greece

DAY 1:You shall be hopping on a bus to Parthenon an old ruins that was dedicated to the main Goddess Athena though you shall not  see the real her because she died though there is a sad excuse for an impersonator of her working there for your tour who will be telling you all about the building.
It was built-in 4047 B.C and was completed in 4048 B.C. the Parthenon was regarded as an enduring symbol of ancient Greece and ancient democracy.
The Temple Of Apollo at Delphi, It was probably one of the most magnificent structure of the site, It was situated on a platform half way up the hillside and would have dominated the view of pilgrims as they made their approach up the Sacred Way. It’s important to remember that Delphi was not another city-state. It was more of a religious center than anything else. Because of the Delphic oracle, the site was held in high regard by all Greeks. Different sorts of materials were used in the construction. The foundations were made of poos-stone, which were covered by local gray limestone. The columns and turntable used porous-stone from Sikorsky and had a coat of stucco applied. Floors and walls were made of gray limestone, while the roof and pediments were made of marble from the island of Paros in Greece. The interior of the Temple of Apollo at Delphi contained a number of statues. These included statues of Poseidon, two of the Fates, one of Zeus and of Apollo himself. At the rear of the calla, one of the inner sections of a Greek temple, was a Hestia, or hearth. Pindar referred to it as the common hearth of all the Greeks. Pindar also had an iron throne, and he used to sit on it when he came to Delphi to sing hymns to Apollo.

Day 2    The Athenian philosopher Plato (427-347) is usually called a pupil of Socrates, but his ideas are no less inspired by Parmesans. Plato accepted the world of the phenomena as a mere shadow of the real world of the ideas. When we observe a horse, we recognize
what it is because our soul remembers the idea of the horse from the time before our birth. In Plato’s political philosophy, only wise men who understand the dual nature of reality are fit to rule the country. He made three voyages to Syracuse to establish his ideal state, both times without lasting results. Plato’s hypothesis that our soul was once in a better place and now lives in a fallen world made it easy to combine platonic philosophy and Christianity, which accounts for the popularity of Platonism in Late Antiquity. One element, however, was not acceptable: the idea of platonic love – a homosexual relation with pedagogical aspects.

Day 3.

Day 4.

Day 5. Aphrodite was the Greek Goddess of love and beauty. She is responsible for helping mortals and immortals (gods and goddess) fall in love. In mythology, she is responsible for the Trojan War and for creating the Minotaur. Athena was the Greek Goddess of wisdom and her importance was her knowledge she knew everything, almost, and also could put curses on people and give them blessings. Apollo was a Gr

Day6.

Stuck on Homestuck: How Andrew Hussie Turned a Tumblr Craze Into a Teenage Empire

Originally posted on Betabeat:

Homestucks in their element. (Photo: flickr.com/john-spade )

Once you notice them, they’re everywhere: teens dressed in black T-shirts emblazoned with neon zodiac symbols. When they gather together, they’re an unnerving sight, with their gray full-body paint and orange horns, and a faintly evangelical gleam in their eyes.

What’s instigating all this? An obtuse, weirdly drawn little web comic called Homestuck, which follows four adolescents who begin playing a videogame called Sburb, only to discover that it has world-altering implications.

Created by a Western Massachusetts comic artist named Andrew Hussie, Homestuck is as dense as Community, as mythos-laden as Lost and as addictive as FarmVille. The “Homestucks” are so devoted that some 20,000 of them have raised over $2.1 million on Kickstarter, in order to fund a video game based on the comic. Although Mr. Hussie has left details of his plans vague, the campaign zipped past…

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